Examen från JCI European Academy 2017

Victoria Träningar 0 Comments

I augusti arrangerade JCI European Academy för 20:e gången. Ledarskapskursen leds av utbildare från hela Europa och lockar även deltagare från hela Europa. I år var fyra av de nästan hundra deltagarna från JCI Sweden och vi passade på att fråga dom om de intensiva dagarna.

Vad har du tagit med dig som du ser som största värdet?
Förutom cirka hundra nya vänner, en handfull djupa insikter i min egen person och kraftiga skiften i vissa av mina fundamentala värderingar; inte så mycket.
Robert Klackenborn, JCI Göteborg


Hur skulle du beskriva JCI European Academy?

Känslosamt och otroligt lärorikt.
Hanna Johansson, JCI Halmstad


Lärde du dig någonting om du själv som du inte redan visste?

Jag kan inte komma på att jag lärde mig något nytt om mig själv men jag fick uppleva hur jag fungerar i olika situationer och i grupp med olika typer av människor.
Henrik Fryk, JCI Göteborg


Hur levde European Academy upp till dina förväntningar?

De medlemmar som deltagit tidigare år från JCI Sundsvall rekommenderade utbildningen som en av de bästa de gått. Mer än så avslöjades egentligen inte. Jag visste lite vilket var bra för den totala upplevelsen. Mitt tips är att inte ta reda på så mycket i förväg (förutom det praktiska så klart). Jag valde istället att fokusera på att vara där i stunden, njuta av hela grejen och ta det som det kommer. Jag förväntade mig en positiv upplevelse och att jag skulle knyta många nya kontakter. Den långa helgen blev över förväntan och dagarna som följde efteråt var en lyckorus. Det går inte att beskriva allt man går genom på de 4 dagar som spenderas med helt okända människor som i slutändan känns som vänner man haft hela livet. Man lär sig så otroligt mycket. Arrangörerna/ utbildningsledarna gör otroligt stort jobb och ger verkligen allt av sig själva för att vi delegater ska få en fantastisk upplevelse – och dem lyckas verkligen!
Romana Culjak, JCI Sundsvall

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Amsterdam 2017: Dutch Habits and Traditions

Victoria Kongresser 0 Comments

 

Once you’ve entered the Dutch aircraft on your way to the Netherlands you will be confronted with Dutch habits and traditions. No, the flight attendance will not wear wooden shoes while the pilot is already sky-high before take-off. It’s in the smaller things, with a bit of luck you might get something to eat on the flight, usually a ‘stroopwafel’ together with your coffee. Or if you’ve boarded the flight around lunch-time you will get the famous Dutch sandwiches for lunch. Indeed the Dutch lunch is equal to the Swedish breakfast, however there are no chocolate sprinkles in Sweden. And the Dutch take the chocolate sprinkles on their sandwiches very seriously. Just an insider tourist tip: walk into a random supermarket and be amazed about the amount of choices the Dutch have in chocolate sprinkles.

Once you’ve left the aircraft and entered the city-center of Amsterdam you might face or be hit by the other Dutch tradition: cycling. Forget everything you know about Lund of maybe Copenhagen. In the Netherlands it is perfectly common to take the bike to cover 20 meters, you park the bike everywhere and if it gets stolen you know someone that knows someone that can get you a ‘new’ one for about 20 euro. You might also think that the Dutch are acrobats on their bikes: a child on the back of the bike, two full shopping bags on each side to the steering bar, keeping up an umbrella and maneuvering past cars to cross that red-light? No problem. Ow and a small note for those who are not used to busy traffic: Look out! Cyclists have very little patience, believe they’re absolutely right and rather run you over than using the bell (that one was never mounted anyway…).

Luckily there are nice traditions in the Netherlands as well. ‘Koningsdag’ for example, next year held on the 27th of April, is epic. It is the only time, together with World/European football championships, the Dutch are proud to be Dutch. During ‘koningsdag’ the Dutch officially celebrate the birthday of the king. However this fact is taken as serious as Swedes officially celebrating the longest day of the year during midsummer. Like midsummer it is a brilliant moment to party the whole day and spend your hard earned cash on alcohol and junk that people try to sell on the street. In the major cities public open air concerts are held, where an eye-watering amount of orange is present.

If you got curious about all the other traditions and habits the Dutch have. For example, why do the Dutch put their shoe in front of the fireplace around the 5th of December? Register for the

Once you’ve entered the Dutch aircraft on your way to the Netherlands you will be confronted with Dutch habits and traditions. No, the flight attendance will not wear wooden shoes while the pilot is already sky-high before take-off. It’s in the smaller things, with a bit of luck you might get something to eat on the flight, usually a ‘stroopwafel’ together with your coffee. Or if you’ve boarded the flight around lunch-time you will get the famous Dutch sandwiches for lunch. Indeed the Dutch lunch is equal to the Swedish breakfast, however there are no chocolate sprinkles in Sweden. And the Dutch take the chocolate sprinkles on their sandwiches very seriously. Just an insider tourist tip: walk into a random supermarket and be amazed about the amount of choices the Dutch have in chocolate sprinkles.

Once you’ve left the aircraft and entered the city-center of Amsterdam you might face or be hit by the other Dutch tradition: cycling. Forget everything you know about Lund of maybe Copenhagen. In the Netherlands it is perfectly common to take the bike to cover 20 meters, you park the bike everywhere and if it gets stolen you know someone that knows someone that can get you a ‘new’ one for about 20 euro. You might also think that the Dutch are acrobats on their bikes: a child on the back of the bike, two full shopping bags on each side to the steering bar, keeping up an umbrella and maneuvering past cars to cross that red-light? No problem. Ow and a small note for those who are not used to busy traffic: Look out! Cyclists have very little patience, believe they’re absolutely right and rather run you over than using the bell (that one was never mounted anyway…).

Luckily there are nice traditions in the Netherlands as well. ‘Koningsdag’ for example, next year held on the 27th of April, is epic. It is the only time, together with World/European football championships, the Dutch are proud to be Dutch. During ‘koningsdag’ the Dutch officially celebrate the birthday of the king. However this fact is taken as serious as Swedes officially celebrating the longest day of the year during midsummer. Like midsummer it is a brilliant moment to party the whole day and spend your hard earned cash on alcohol and junk that people try to sell on the street. In the major cities public open air concerts are held, where an eye-watering amount of orange is present.

If you got curious about all the other traditions and habits the Dutch have. For example, why do the Dutch put their shoe in front of the fireplace around the 5th of December? Register for the JCI World Congress!

 

By: Gerben Doornbos

 

Join the us for a week of networking, learning and fun. All info on www.jcisweden.se/wc2017

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Amsterdam 2017: The Dutch language

Victoria Kongresser 0 Comments

As the English would say: Dutch is not a language but an illness to the throat. And you might agree with those gingers on that rainy rock in the Atlantic when you want to pronounce: ‘de geschiedenisschrijver schrijft zijn geschiedenis (the history writer writes its history). Indeed the Dutch language knows a lot of ‘g’ and ‘sch’ sounds, but rest assured: a large part of the Dutch population cannot pronounce them properly either. They all life in the southern provencies of ‘Brabant’ and ‘Limburg’, and yes the rest of the Netherlands looks at them the same as Sweden looks at Skåne.

Like Swedish the Dutch language is also a Germanic language, so when you will be in the Netherlands you will probably be able to understand most of the written text. Although a word like ‘klantenservice’ (customerservice) might raise some Swedish eyebrows. On the other hand the word ‘trött’ (bitch) and ‘bil’ (butt) might result in some giggles on the Dutch side. A lot of the words that are similar in both language come from the sailing tough, it shouldn’t be that hard to deduce the Swedish version of the words: stuurboord, mast, dek, zeil and lijn.

When you want to speak some Dutch during the world congress make sure you comply to the following rules before you even start learning words:

1. Talk loud, even if the person is within 50 cm range

2. Talk everywhere and to anyone; everybody on the bus is interested in the stories you are about to tell.

3. You always have an opinion; even if you don’t. Not having an opinion is an opinion in itself isn’t it?

4. Never ever let the other person finish his or her sentence, your opinion is by default more interesting. When the other person doesn’t let you, go back to rule number 1.

5. Be direct and say everything that comes to your mind. If the other person is bothered by your statements that is not your problem.

6. Complain, the weather, food, the national railways, you name it…. So once you’ve mastered the six basic rule here are a few useful Dutch words you might want to practice:

– Alstublieft – Please/if you please
Please bear in mind that this is the formal form, like in German and French the Dutch make the difference between sie/vous/u and du/tu/je.

– Dankuwel – thank you

– Een rondje van mij – this round is on me

– Nee, dat zie ik anders – No, I see that differently

– Zullen we naar de volgende kroeg gaan? – Shall we go to the next bar?

– Waar is mijn hotel? – Where I my hotel?

And if you really want to practice I refer to the rap of the Osdorp posse – Origineel Amsterdams, a hit from the 90’s where in 3:56 min all the Amsterdam slang is explained.

Text: Gerben Doornbos
[email protected]

 

 

Join the us for a week of networking, learning and fun. All info on www.jcisweden.se/wc2017

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

National Conngress 2017: Midsummer Offer

Victoria Kongresser 0 Comments

Join the JCI Sweden National Congress on October 20-22 for 1 345 kr only! Through registering here: https://jcimalmo.enkelanmalan.se/12/
Grab the opportunity to listen to some of the most interesting people in the swedish and international business scene right now:
Fredrik Carling – Hövding
Daniel Daboczy – Founded By Me
Albin Wilson – Uniti
…and other inspiring lectures and workshops from people you don’t want to miss the chance to meet…
Included is also the entrance to one of Malmös oldest networking events, now represented as JCI Malmö Mingle & Networking.
More information at our website, Facebook page and event. Like and stay tuned!
Reduced price available between 23 June – 14 July. Register here: https://jcimalmo.enkelanmalan.se/12
Don’t miss out!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Årets medlem 2016 – De nominerade är

Victoria Nyheter 0 Comments

Nu har det blivit dags för oss att börja presentera de nominerade för 2016 års belöningar. Nytt för i år kära vänner är att vi väljer att lägga den avgörande rösten i denna kategori hos er. Vi har tre fantastiska medlemmar som alla blivit nominerade av andra medlemmar (tack för alla bidrag!) och de tre finalisterna är Hanna Johansson från JCI Halmstad, Marie Pihl från JCI Malmö och Andreas Lindvall från JCI Stockholm. Alla tre har gjort fantastiska insatser för sina lokalkammare och nedan kan ni läsa mer om varför de är nominerade.

Omröstningen hittar ni längst ner. OBS! Omröstningen stänger den 29 mars 2017.

 

HANNA JOHANSSON, JCI HALMSTAD
(Nominerad av Hanna Westman, JCI Halmstad)

Tre ord som beskriver Hanna: Engagerad, handlingskraftig, kräftgeneral!

Därför är Hanna nominerad: Hanna Johansson gjorde det storstilade, traditionsenliga och värdefulla Halmstad-projectet International Crayfish Conference möjligt 2016!

Så anammar  Hanna på mottot Vilja, Våga, Växa: Hanna Johansson definierar orden vilja, våga växa. Och hon visar det med mod, handlingskraft och en stor dos envishet.

 

ANDREAS LINDVALL, JCI STOCKHOLM
(Nominerad av Anna Söderbom, JCI Stockholm)

Tre ord som beskriver Andreas: Engagerad, öppen, positiv

Därför är Andreas nominerad: Andreas har en tendens att alltid se positivt på saker och ting, vilket smittar av sig till omgivningen. När jag var LP frågade han ofta om jag behövde hjälp med något – han är en fin klippa. Andreas var med i styrelsen och deltog i många av JCI Stockholms träffar under 2016. Han hjälpte även till med projekt Open Doors. På internationellt plan var han med och representerade JCI Stockholm på Europakonferensen i Finland. Jag tycker verkligen att han förtjänar en extra hyllning för det stöd och engagemang han visar.

Så anammar Andras på mottot Vilja, Våga, Växa: Andreas anammar allt med optimism och drömmer stort. Det är på nåt vis grunden hos Andreas. Han accepterar nya utmaningar och deltar i projekt för att vi ska ta oss framåt.

 

MARIE PIHL, JCI MALMÖ
(Nominerad av Stina Torén, JCI Malmö)

Tre ord som beskriver Marie: Omtänksam, prestigelös, generös.

Därför är Marie nominerad: Marie har under en rad år varit mycket aktiv inom JCI Malmö, nationellt och internationellt. Dels då hon var lokalpresident 2005 och organiserade NK till att hon sedan återuppstarten 2014 varit en ovärderlig tillgång för den lokala kammarens fortsatta utveckling. Hon har med sitt nätverk, sitt aktiva deltagande i nyckelposition som bl a kassör, sin kunskap om och erfarenhet från föreningens tidigare verksamhetsår kunnat lotsa och stötta både mer erfarna men inte minst nya medlemmar och därmed utgjort en starkt bidragande faktor till att JCI Malmö åter blivit en vital lokalförening att räkna

Så anammar Marie mottot Vilja, Våga, Växa: Marie verkar med stor vilja och intresse för att JCI Malmö och JCI Sweden ska leva vidare och utvecklas som en stark organisation. Hon uppmuntrar andra, ofta mindre erfarna medlemmar att våga ta nya roller och engagera sig aktivt i föreningens verksamhet. Marie har med sin gedigna erfarenhet varit en viktig drivkraft för att hjälpa JCI och dess medlemmar att växa, som förening och som människor.

 

Vem är årets medlem 2016?

Hanna Johansson, JCI Halmstad
Andreas Lindwall, JCI Stockholm
Marie Pihl, JCI Malmö

QuizMaker

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail